Major Muhammad Akram Shaheed (NH): Battle of Hilli’s Hero

by on July 3, 2011
in Pride of Pakistan

Major Muhammad Akram

Major Muhammad Akram (April 14, 1938 – Decemer 1971) was a Pakistani Army officer who embraced martyrdom during the Indo-Pak war of 1971. Muhammad Akram was born in Dinga city of District Gujrat while he belonged to village Nakka Kalan of District Jhelum, Punjab. He was born in an Awan tribe of Pakistan.

After completing his early education, Akram appeared for Pakistan Army selection and was selected for the 1963 batch of Pakistan Military Academy. Akram graduated from PMA and was commissioned in the Frontier Force Regiment on October 16, 1963. While being posted at Lahore cantonment, Major Muhammad Akram (then Captain) participated in the 1965 Indo-Pak War. He was commander of a small company which preformed successful operations against the Indian Army.

In 1969, Captain Muhammad Akram was promoted to the rank of Major and was soon posted to East Pakistan (now Bangladesh). After the start of civil war in East Pakistan, Major Muhammad Akram’s unit 4 FF was placed in the forward area of Hilli district as war was impending between India and Pakistan. After the unannounced attack by India of East Pakistan, he and his men were subjected to heavy air, artillery and armour attacks from Indian Army. For almost fortnight, Major Muhammad Akram and his troops were able to force Indians back and inflicting heavy damages to them. He got injured during the battle and later embraced martyrdom. He was buried in the village of District Bogra of East Pakistan (now Bangaldesh). He was posthumously awarded Nishan-e-Haider by the Pakistani government. He is the only soldier of Pakistan Army who is buried in foreign land but received Nishan e Haider. In his remembrance, a memorial was built in the city of Jhelum.

 

Rohtas Fort

by on December 9, 2010
in Travel Pakistan

Forts in Pakistan-Rohtas fort

After Sher Shah Suri the Afghan ruler defeated Moghul King Humayun, Suri decided to build a strong complex at a point from where he could successfully block the advances of Humayun and his allies the Gakhars who refused to side with Suri.

A gorge some 16km North West of Jehlum was chosen as the site of the Rohtas Fort. The Fort is built on a hillock 300 feet and the huge complex occupies an area of 12.63 acres. Built mainly for military purpose, the fort is charming in its own strange way. The building style is a rich blend of Afghan and Hindu architecture. The fort could house 30,000 men and features such as the trap gates, massive walls, 68 towers, 3 stepped walls (called Baolis) and the fortification wall were added to make the fort almost invincible. The fort complex includes a mosque called the Shahi Mosque, Rani Mahal and Haveli Maan Singh.

The fort has 12 gates with interesting names and a few with interesting stories. The fort is decorated with engravings in Arabic and sun flower motifs, some specimen of calligraphy are also found here but the general look and feel of the fort is more of a military base rather then a luxurious dwelling. For this very reason the fort was unpopular with the Moghul kings who had a rather refined taste. this fort to the Gakhars. The Rohtas Fort still remains a grand piece of architecture.

Suri died before the Fort could be completed and Humayun the new ruler of India gave

Canal System of Pakistan

by on January 31, 2010
in Hydropower

Thal_Canal of Pakistan

Irrigation is the man-made supply of water to the land to encourage vegetation. It is a substitute for inadequate or erratic rainfall and is extremely essential for arid regions where there are no rivers and also in humid regions to improve crop output. In Pakistan, 75% of the agricultural land is under irrigation. Three major water sources in Pakistan are rain water, ground water and rivers.

Irrigation system is not something new. Since olden days, people had devised various methods to water their fields. Some traditional methods of irrigation are Persian Wheel, Charsa and Shaduf. Karez is another traditional irrigation system practiced in Baluchistan only. Karez is a horizontal canal located mainly on the foot hills and it brings the under ground water to the surface. Modern advancements in the irrigation system are the perennial canals and tube wells.
Pakistan is basically a dry country with the River Indus and its tributaries being the main source of water supply. Dams both large and small and barrages have been built on the Indus and its tributaries. Large dams such as Tarbela Dam and Mangla Dam are multipurpose plans which not only store water, irrigate lands but also generate hydro electricity. Small dams like Khanpur Dam, Rawal Dam and Hub Dam supply water for agriculture, industrial and domestic purpose and act as a reservoir as well. A hilly terrain is required to build a dam. Barrages on the other hand are built on flat places they also supply water for irrigation purpose and industrial and domestic use. Some barrages are Sukkur Barrage, Guddu Barrage, Kotri Barrage, and Chashma Barrage.

Canals are taken out from rivers, dams and barrages. Pakistan has one of the largest canal irrigation systems in the world. The Inundation canals are taken from rivers and they receive water only when the water level in the rivers is high such as during floods. The perennial canals are taken from dams and barrages and supply water to the fields through out the year. In Pakistan there are 3 large dams, 85 small dams, 19 barrages, 12 inter link canals, 45 canals and 0.7 million tube wells to meet the commercial, domestic and irrigational needs of the country.